Which Dr Seuss Book Was Banned In China?

Dr. Seuss’s And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street was banned in China. Find out why this popular book was censored.

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Dr Seuss’s books are popular around the world, but not all of them are available in China. The country’s censors have banned a number of his titles, including ‘And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street’ and ‘The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins’.

China has a long history of censorship

China has a long history of censorship, and it extends to literature as well. In fact, several Dr. Seuss books have been banned in China, including “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street” and “The Sneetches.” The reasons for the ban are varied, but often have to do with the book’s purported political message.

Dr Seuss’s book ‘And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street’ was banned in China

Dr Seuss’s book ‘And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street’ was banned in China for depicting Chinese people in a negative light. The book tells the story of a young boy who is ridiculed by his peers for telling tall tales, but then goes on to have a very successful career as a writer.

The reasons why the book was banned

Dr. Seuss’s book And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street was banned in China in 1965. The book tells the story of a young boy who sees many exciting things on his way home from school, but when he tries to tell his father about them, he is told to “think more sensibly”. The book was seen as a criticism of Chinese society, and the ban was not lifted until 1991.

The impact of the ban

The book in question is And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, which was published in 1937. The book was banned in China in 2015, reportedly because the Chinese government felt that it contained “controversial” imagery.

The ban generated a significant amount of backlash from Chinese citizens, who took to social media to express their displeasure. Many people felt that the book was an important part of their childhood and that the ban was an infringement on their freedom of expression.

It is worth noting that this is not the first time that a Dr Seuss book has been banned in China; The Lorax was also banned in 1992, reportedly for its “environmentalism.”

How the book found its way back into China

In 2015, a Chinese company published a translated version of Dr. Seuss’ On Beyond Zebra, making it the first Dr. Seuss book to be printed in China. But this wasn’t the first time the book had been available in the country. In fact, the book was originally banned in China.

The book was first published in 1955 and was quickly banned in China after officials deemed it “bourgeois nonsense” that was “poisoning” the minds of Chinese children. It wasn’t until 2015 that the book found its way back into China, when a Chinese company published a translated version.

Despite the fact that the book was banned for over 60 years, it turns out that On Beyond Zebra was actually quite popular in China during that time. The book was smuggled into the country and copies were circulated among students and intellectuals.

The current situation with Dr Seuss’s books in China

Since the death of Dr Seuss in 1991, his books have continued to be popular around the world. However, in China, some of his books have been banned. The reason for this is because the Chinese government feels that they contain “political and cultural sensitivities”.

One of the most controversial Dr Seuss books is “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street”. This book was banned in China because it was seen as critical of Chinese culture.

Another book that has been banned in China is “The Lorax”. This book is about environmentalism and the Chinese government feels that it promotes a “Western” lifestyle.

“Horton Hears a Who!” is another book that has been banned in China. This book contains a character who speaks out against injustice, which is something that the Chinese government does not encourage.

The future of Dr Seuss’s books in China

It’s no secret that China has a long history of banning books. In fact, the country has been censoring literature for centuries. So, it should come as no surprise that Dr Seuss’s books are no exception.

While it’s difficult to know exactly which Dr Seuss book was banned in China, it’s safe to say that most of his works are probably not welcome in the country. This is due to the fact that Dr Seuss’s books often contain political messages that are not in line with the Chinese government’s beliefs.

For example, The Lorax is a book about environmentalism and conservation, two topics that the Chinese government does not support. The Sneetches is a book about racism and tolerance, two more topics that the Chinese government does not agree with.

It’s possible that the Chinese government may one day change its stance on Dr Seuss’s books, but for now, it seems unlikely that his works will be widely available in the country anytime soon.

Other banned books in China

China has a long history of banning books that are considered sensitive or offensive. In addition to Seuss’ “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street,” other banned books include “The Catcher in the Rye,” “To Kill a Mockingbird” and “Animal Farm.” More recent bans have included books such as “Harry Potter” and “The Hunger Games.”

The importance of freedom of expression

It is widely known that the Chinese government censors a great deal of the information that its citizens have access to. This censorship extends to books, and several Dr. Seuss books have been banned in China. The most well-known of these is The Butter Battle Book, which was banned for its depiction of the Cold War. However, there are other Dr. Seuss books that have been censored in China, including And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street and If I Ran the Zoo.

The banning of these books is a clear violation of freedom of expression, and it is disappointing to see such a heavy-handed response from the Chinese government. Dr. Seuss is a beloved children’s author, and his books should be available to all children, regardless of where they live.

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