Who Is Greta Thunberg?

Greta Thunberg is a Swedish teenager who, in August 2018, started protesting against the lack of action on climate change outside the Swedish parliament. Her actions have inspired a global movement of young people to demand action on climate change.

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Greta Thunberg’s Early Life

Born on January 3, 2003, in Stockholm, Sweden, Greta Thunberg was raised in a family with strong environmentalist roots. As a teenager, she began to speaking up about the need for more urgent action to combat climate change. In August 2018, she skipped school to protest in front of the Swedish parliament—a movement that soon caught on internationally, with other students staging similar walkouts around the world. In September 2019, Thunberg was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Greta Thunberg’s Asperger’s Diagnosis

Greta Thunberg is a Swedish climate activist who has been diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome, a form of autism. She first gained notoriety in August 2018 when she began protesting outside the Swedish parliament, calling for stronger action on climate change. Her protests have since gone global, inspiring students around the world to participate in strikes and demonstrations demanding action on the climate crisis. In 2019, Thunberg was named Time magazine’s Person of the Year and was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Greta Thunberg’s Climate Change Activism

Greta Thunberg is a Swedish teenager who has become an influential voice in the fight against climate change. In August 2018, she began protesting outside the Swedish parliament to demand stronger action on global warming. Her actions inspired student protests around the world, and she has since addressed the United Nations General Assembly and spoken at numerous high-profile events. Thunberg has been praised for her passion and courage in speaking out about the need for urgent action to combat climate change.

Greta Thunberg’s Speech at the United Nations

Greta Thunberg, a 16-year-old Swedish student and climate activist, spoke at the United Nations Climate Action Summit on September 23, 2019. In her speech, Thunberg criticized world leaders for their inaction on climate change and urged them to take immediate action to address the crisis.

Thunberg first gained attention in August 2018, when she began protesting outside the Swedish parliament to demand action on climate change. She continued her protests every Friday, and her actions inspired students around the world to participate in similar “school strike for climate” protests.

Thunberg’s speech at the UN Climate Action Summit was widely acclaimed, and she has since been interviewed by numerous news outlets and named one of Time magazine’s “Person of the Year” for 2019.

Greta Thunberg’s Meeting with Pope Francis

Greta Thunberg, a 16-year-old Swedish girl, has become the most visible face of the youth-led climate change movement. On April 16th, 2019, Greta met with Pope Francis at the Vatican to discuss the issue of climate change and what can be done to address it.

Greta first rose to prominence in August 2018, when she began protesting against the lack of action on climate change outside the Swedish Parliament. She subsequently startedskip schooling every Friday to continue her protest, and her actions quickly began to gain attention both in Sweden and internationally. In just a few months, Greta had become a leading voice in the fight against climate change, inspiring millions of people around the world to take action on this critical issue.

Greta’s meeting with Pope Francis is significant because it shows that even one of the most powerful leaders in the world is taking her seriously and is willing to listen to what she has to say. This is a testament to the power of youth voices in bringing about change, and it is sure to inspire even more young people to get involved in the fight for a better future.

Greta Thunberg’s Meeting with Barack Obama

Greta Thunberg, a 16-year-old Swedish student who became famous for skipping school to protest climate change, met with former US President Barack Obama on Monday.

The two had a “long and wide-ranging conversation,” according to Thunberg’s Twitter account.

The teenager has become a internationally-recognized figure in the fight against climate change, and has inspired similar protests around the world.

Greta Thunberg’s Time Magazine Person of the Year

In December of 2019, Greta Thunberg was named Time Magazine’s Person of the Year. Greta is a 16 year old girl from Sweden who, in August of 2018, stopped going to school every day. Instead, she held up a hand-lettered sign outside the Swedish parliament that said (in English): “School strike for the climate.”

Greta’s one-person protest quickly evolved into a global movement. Students in other countries started striking from school to demand action on climate change. Adults joined in, too. Businesses and organizations began divesting from fossil fuels. Governments began to adopt more ambitious plans to reduce emissions and transition to renewable energy sources.

Thunberg has been credited with energizing a global youth climate movement and awakening the world to the urgency of the climate crisis. In just over a year, she has gone from obscurity to international fame, becoming one of the most recognizable faces – and voices – of her generation.

Greta Thunberg’s Nobel Peace Prize Nomination

Sixteen-year-old Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg has been nominated for the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize by three Norwegian lawmakers. The lawmakers say they have nominated her “for her work for climate justice and for giving hope to many people around the world who are fighting for a better future.”

Thunberg first rose to prominence in August 2018, when she began protesting outside her country’s parliament every Friday to demand action on climate change. Her one-person protest quickly grew into a worldwide movement, with students in more than 100 countries strikes from school to demand that their leaders take action on climate change.

In December 2018, Thunberg was named Time magazine’s Person of the Year, and she delivered a powerful speech at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Katowice, Poland, in December 2018. She has also been nominated for the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize by Norwegian lawmakers.

Greta Thunberg’s United States Tour

In August 2019, 16-year-old Greta Thunberg embarked on a tour of the United States to raise awareness about the climate crisis. The Swedish activist first came to international attention in 2018, when she began protesting outside of the Swedish parliament every Friday. Her demands were simple: that the Swedish government take immediate action to reduce Sweden’s carbon emissions in accordance with the Paris Climate Agreement.

Thunberg’s protests caught the attention of media and politicians alike, and she quickly became a leading voice in the fight against climate change. In September 2019, she addressed the United Nations Climate Action Summit, and her impassioned speech garnered praise from world leaders and environmentalists alike.

During her tour of the United States, Thunberg visited a number of cities, including New York City, Washington D.C., Boston, and San Francisco. In each city, she met with local activists and gave speeches urging Americans to take action on climate change. She also participated in a number of high-profile protests, including one at the White House and another at Wall Street.

Thunberg’s tour was widely successful in raising awareness about climate change; her speeches inspired many Americans to take action on this critical issue.

Greta Thunberg’s Future Plans

While her exact future plans are unclear, Greta Thunberg has said that she plans to continue fighting for climate justice. In an interview with British Vogue, Thunberg stated, “I want to see the Paris Agreement and the goals that were set in it actually being reached and exceeded. We have 12 years left to halve emissions, and after that it gets really serious. The next 10 years are crucial.” She also said that she plans to continue speaking out and highlighting the need for climate action, as well as working with others to demand change.

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